Ralf Weiser's Blog – Shake Up Your Snow Globe! ©

Stop doing, shake your globe, ponder, dream, start reaching your full potential – live on purpose and do it with a smile!

Archive for the category “learn and earn”

What do you think of Mike Rowe’s S.W.E.A.T. pledge?


What do you think of Mike Rowe’s S.W.E.A.T. pledge? 

Photo credit: Pablo by Buffer

Mike Rowe is a well-known TV personality (e.g. Dirty Jobs and Deadliest Catch). As such he also had made a name for himself breaking the college mandate for High School students. He has been promoting blue-collar careers all along. Mike’s own work ethic scholarship program has candidate sign the above-mentioned S.W.E.A.T. pledge. How do you feel about it? See for yourself here: http://profoundlydisconnected.com/skill-work-ethic-arent-taboo/

“THE S.W.E.A.T. PLEDGE”

(Skill & Work Ethic Aren’t Taboo)

 

  1. I believe that I have won the greatest lottery of all time. I am alive. I walk the Earth. I live in America. Above all things, I am grateful.

 

  1. I believe that I am entitledto life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Nothing more. I also understand that “happiness” and the “pursuit of happiness” are not the same thing.

 

  1. I believe there is no such thing as a “bad job.” I believe that all jobs are opportunities, and it’s up to me to make the best of them.

 

  1. I do not “follow my passion.” I bring it with me. I believe that any job can be done with passion and enthusiasm.

 

  1. I deplore debt, and do all I can to avoid it. I would rather live in a tent and eat beans than borrow money to pay for a lifestyle I can’t afford.

 

  1. I believe that my safety is my responsibility. I understand that being in “compliance” does not necessarily mean I’m out of danger.

 

  1. I believe the best way to distinguish myself at work is to show up early, stay late, and cheerfully volunteer for every crappy task there is.

 

  1. I believe the most annoying sounds in the world are whining and complaining. I will never make them. If I am unhappy in my work, I will either find a new job, or find a way to be happy.

 

  1. I believe that my education is my responsibility, and absolutely critical to my success. I am resolved to learn as much as I can from whatever source is available to me. I will never stop learning, and understand that library cards are free.

 

  1. I believe that I am a product of my choices – not my circumstances. I will never blame anyone for my shortcomings or the challenges I face. And I will never accept the credit for something I didn’t do.

 

  1. I understand the world is not fair, and I’m OK with that. I do not resent the success of others.

 

  1. I believe that all people are created equal. I also believe that all people make choices. Some choose to be lazy. Some choose to sleep in. I choose to work my butt off.

 

On my honor, I hereby affirm the above statements to be an accurate summation of my personal worldview. I promise to live by them.

 

Signed_______________________________________ Dated____________________

 

 

There are some folks who feel that this is going too far. Read about an example and Mike’s response here. http://mikerowe.com/2017/05/otwappalledbythesweatpledge/

I am not sure that insisting any new applicants and team members having to sign a document like this will help shape new habits. I have come to accept almost all of his 12 points as my core beliefs and values. I would not tell other people to having to make it their own just by agreeing to them by signing a document. That is so Baby-Boom and GenX like. If we want to make an impact that even Millennials want to buy in on than we have to create a work and school environment that is embracing, meaning demonstrating what is asked for here. That is done by asking questions using full transparency and collaboration – just do not stand in front of them telling them. If this is what new candidates find while attending Mike’s program I think that people have no reason to gripe. What do you think?

Ralf

Advertisements

Your parents may be the dumbest people you will ever meet, and…


Your parents may be the dumbest people you will ever meet, and… 

Recently I went to an event that highlighted the workforce development crisis that has hit almost all industries in the region: Low unemployment rates that have been around for a while and the younger folks do not seem to be excited getting into the workforce early on. Manufacturing, Agriculture, Emergency providers, Hospitals, Trades, and even IT, etc are all dying at the vine for new team members. Among many issues one struck me as a new caveat: Millennials and younger adults are having issues finding and then connecting to future employers. How sad is this?

Assuming this is truth to this it would be sad indeed. One speaker then asserted the following, and I quote: “Your parents may be the dumbest people you will ever meet, and yet they are connected”. Going back to my youth I can totally identify with adolescents not wanting to have anything to do with their parents. On the other hand, they are indeed connected with so many people in many different circles. Why not make use of this invaluable resource. A parent should not get you the job, but they can certainly connect you with a person or place that may offer you a job. Make good use of this opportunity. Businesses do not hire people. People hire people and that requires connecting at a personal level.

There are so many open positions and exciting careers are waiting for suitable candidates. I am most excited about the many new opportunities that finally offer new career paths that allow starting a job and / or apprenticeship path that also embeds post-secondary education in it. This “yes and” pathway no longer lets students and parents dread having to make the choice between either going to college, or “just” joining the workforce. I am even more excited about more and more organizations paying attention to offering tuition re-imbursement, a career path, and a lot of support and structure helping team members get there.

All you need to do is allowing your parents to connect you with a person that just may listen to you – and it may lead to a new career path.

Ralf

3 must-have things that your company must be able to offer to Millennials


3 must-have things that your company must be able to offer to Millennials Ralf a

This post is directed toward business leaders and entrepreneurs currently looking to fill open positions in their organizations. Are you shying away from attracting the Millennial age group? I see and hear it all the time: “They are so entitled”, “They cling to their cell phones”, “They don’t stay”, “They are way to aggressive with their growth plans”, and so many more. I cannot hear it any more. Like it or not, these young and talented (I might add, very talented) people are our future work force and they are awesome.

Why do I say this? They are awesome multitaskers for starters. They grew up with technology from the day they were born. They were challenged and put under so much more pressure education and expectation wise like no other generation before. They are not afraid of taking entrepreneurial risk and thus are not afraid to take freelancing positions. They thrive in a good company cultures that embraces them and they can be loyal like no other generation before them. That leads me to three key items that your organization must be able to provide to them in order for them to be attracted enough to join you and then to stay around:

  1. Purpose: Like no other generation before them they like for their time to count for something. Is it worth their time to spent time with you and your company? How will this make other people better off? Is the organization willing to do something for community and environment?
  2. Structure: They embrace structure. This means everything from training plan, to career building. While Babyboomer and GenX folks may be excited by hearing their leaders giving them the freedom to “go figure it out yourself”, Millennials thrive in an evironment where there are hard and soft rules how you want them to handle tasks and finding solutions for everyday problems. They excel at sharing information and solutions – how cool is this?
  3. Career pathway: Millennials are very keen on finding out early what their career advancement may look like and how to get there. They may be to overzealous, but they are very excited to put the effort into their careers and they can be very loyal to an organization that is willing to help them get there. The only effort the business leader must make is creating the career pathway plan how their employees can get there.

According to a study published in SmartCEO recently manufacturing has the 4th oldest workforce. This will mean these folks with be aging out at impressive numbers within the next 5 to 10 years. Companies had better figure out a better way embracing the up and coming new team members, or they will lose out to business leaders who make the effort preparing their organizations accordingly. Please welcome all age and education groups into your organization, or you will face significant issues in attaining and then retaining talent.

Ralf

12 questions fostering servant leadership in business leaders


12 questions fostering servant leadership in business leaders Smaller FB

What is a servant leader? This is a leader-manager who understands that he is the one who serves his team and not the other way around. It is great to see and hear that more and more old fashioned toxic working environments with their command-and-control antics are being thrown to the curb.

Servant leadership has a solid foundation in self-awareness of the leader. But how can you pursue it? The best tool in your servant leadership tool box is reflection and meditation. Know thyself is a phrase that you should make your mantra. Please find below a variety of questions we should ask ourselves frequently:

  • What were the most annoying traits of my past managers? Take this list and devise a plan avoiding to make the same mistakes.
  • What can I do to have my feedback meetings on time? Timely feedback reviews and making them a priority is key to team members feel that they are taken just as serious as an “important” customer, or project.
  • How can I show that I really am listening to my conversation partner? Being present in any one-on-one or team meeting is one of the main commitments we must make to our team members. Body language and mimics and the phone not being on DND can be a major obstacle in creating great rapport.
  • How should I prepare a meeting such that my team members can constructively partake in it? Is my meeting about a conversation for understanding, interpretation, exploration of opportunities, or for action? How does the meeting facilitator make sure the meeting is about the “is” condition and not about the “should-be’s”? How can I make sure we start and stop our meetings on time?
  • How do I as the leader get the respect of my team members? How do I get to know what they do every day and would I be able to do what they do?
  • What is my best method approach to getting buy-in and collaboration from my team members towards minor and major changes in the organization or the team?
  • How do I make sure a yearly feedback meetings, one-on-one meeting and department meetings are held periodically?
  • How do I best provide feedback on how and when to deliver performance feedback to the people I serve as quarterback?
  • How and what do I do to show that I appreciate each individual’s personal contribution to the team’s effort?
  • When an employee says something, what is he/she really saying? What and how (also how much) something is said is often indicative of personal, process, product, or team issues.
  • How can we best facilitate change – any change? How do we guide our employees through resistance, sorrow, exploration of opportunities, and finally the commitment to change? The direct path from A to B for change is a leadership illusion.

 

Here is my request to ponder the questions and finding answers for them that we can implement expediently. Can you see the underlining issues dealing with communication, prioritization, meeting preparation, job shadowing, servant leadership, and perhaps a few more challenges that any leader-manager struggles with? No one is an exception to the rule, and I know that I am frequently challenged and reminded of my own short comings. Key to becoming a great leader-manager is a greater self-awareness. We owe this to the people whom we serve.

Ralf

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: